Tag: amazon

E-books in higher demand than print

If print books are returning to prominence, why are they cheaper than e-books?

While book browsing on Amazon the other day, I noticed the price of an e-book is almost always a dollar or two more than the paper version of the same book. The print book costs more for publishers to produce than an e-book, yet is less expensive to buy.

E-books are not physical inventory items, so Amazon has no reason to unload them in a hurry, whereas print books are lying around, taking up warehouse space, so maybe Amazon wants to sell them faster to get rid of them.

Or, maybe it is simply a case of supply and demand and e-books are in higher demand. I seem to remember a time when e-books were much cheaper than print, but that was prior to the smartphone era. You used to have to own a Kindle to read an e-book and Kindles were expensive, so one incentive to buy a Kindle was the ability to buy cheaper books. Now, everyone with a smartphone can use a Kindle app for free and e-book prices are rising.

Amazon wouldn’t raise the price of e-books if people weren’t paying, so people must be willing to pay more for the e-books. That can only be for one reason: convenience. If I decide I want to read A Wrinkle in Time, I can go online and order the e-book and start reading it in less than a minute, or I can order the print version and start reading it next week.

Print books will eventually die off for the same reason video rental stores and printed newspapers are dying off. They are inconvenient and unnecessary.

Can I throw away my Kindle?

A woman I know loves to read books, but never finds the time. Recently, she became determined to make time for some books, so she went book shopping. She has a Kindle, but didn’t even bother to charge it up. Instead, she ordered print books online.

“I want a real book to curl up on the couch with,” she said.

We hear more and more lately about how people are going back to print books from e-books, but are they really? Are they actually reading the print books, or just buying them? The truth is, knowing the woman as I do, I am positive she won’t read those books she bought. If she ever finishes the books, it will be two or three years from now, maybe longer.

I think people like the idea of reading books and buying them is part of a fantasy world. They envision themselves curled up on that couch, drinking tea and digesting the latest historical novel, but that fantasy never quite fits into their day. We’ll see if she ever reads those books. If she does, I’ll let you all know.

 

 

The greatest compliment

I usually don’t get past the first page or two of most books, so the greatest compliment I can give any book is to finish it. I sample a lot of books and it’s a pretty decent compliment if I pass the first chapter. I found a random book yesterday that lured me beyond the nine percent mark on Kindle. The book is Deadly Messengers by Susan May.

I plunged right in without reading any blurbs and found the general writing style to my liking and the story intriguing enough. I will continue reading it today and see how far I get. The beauty of reading on Kindle Unlimited is I can quit the book anytime.

If I make it all the way through, I may even take a stab at writing a short review for this blog. I promise to keep it short to increase the odds that you will finish it.

 

The Kindle Scout program

Today I discovered the Kindle Scout program, a system which allows amateur readers to read amateur works and decide which e-books are potentially publishable. This is not exactly how the system is described, but that’s exactly what it is. For the official description of “reader-powered” publishing, click here.

I sampled a couple of the books available and they were not worth recommending, but the Kindle Scout program is worth noticing. It marks a corporate embrace of a self-publishing world in which all the dirty work is done by the self-publishers for free. Somewhere an agent and perhaps an editor are looking for a new line of work, if they think reader-powered publishing stands a chance at success. Could the days of sending manuscripts to agents be ending?

What is an agent, but just a person with an opinion about a writer’s submission? Does an agent really know which books will be a big hit? Maybe the really good agents do, but what about those worker-bee agents who are essentially glorified readers, combing the desert for the next Harry Potter?

Maybe I’m way off base. Having only met one agent in my life, perhaps the publishing world doesn’t work the way I think it does. Still, the Kindle people appear to be pushing the future of publishing to a new level. The idea may ultimately fail due to lack of readable content, but Amazon is powerful enough to take the chance.

As a reader, I am thirsty for some great writer to get my attention, but am I willing to wade through a bunch of random writing in hopes of finding something brilliant? Am I willing to become the worker-bee agent for free? No, I am not. So, who is?

What kind of person would be reading a submission of mine? Is it someone with a refined taste for modern literature, or a bored teenager seeking a few laughs?

Kindle Scout presents lots of questions, while forcing a modern reader and writer to ponder what the system is creating. Maybe I can submit a work to be read by “scouts” and at least know somebody gave it a chance. I can’t always know that about submissions to agents. Perhaps it is a good thing for submissions to be read by regular people instead of paid agents.

I guess the biggest conclusion I draw from exploring the Kindle Scout system is that Kindle is continuing to innovate in ways that other booksellers are not, making the survival of Kindle more likely than the survival of Nook or Kobo or iBooks. Kindle is turning into a bit of a writer’s community, much like WordPress, but for books that writers can theoretically sell for actual money.